Geek's Home page (or Blog...or whatever)

To view and navigate these webpages, click on any 'topic' in the list in the LEFT PANE. When finished with that topic, first try and see if the browser's back-arrow button is armed and use that if it is. Otherwise, simply delete/stop that 'browser-tab' and your view should return to the previously-viewed page.

The 2-bladed paddle rules!

Kayak Rolling primer (Learning the eskimo roll)

[ kayaker paddling ]
Vasudeva also was enlightened on the river
My two MOST FAVORITE websites on the Internet
#1 - Wikipedia !

I once pondered the query of "if there was just one website on the whole Internet, which one would you want it to be?". Almost immediately, my answer was "That's easy." The Internet's 'encyclopedia': Wikipedia ! !

#2 -The 'StackExchange' family of Q/A communities

Much more recently, I arrived at a nominee for my 2nd-favorite Internet site. My 2nd place choice is one called "stackexchange". In a nushell, it is a 'community' of Question/Answer forums. (I believe there's now about 100 sites in the whole family.) Each community covers a separate 'field of knowledge', whether it be a hobby or a career-discipline or whatever. Here is their page describing all the various communities within the whole 'stackexchange' family of communities: List of community sites

For example, let's say someone's hobby was gardening...they would choose (and join): the Gardening community whereas a career psychiatrist might join: cognitive sciences community which includes psychology psychiatry, and other related disciplines.

Of course, you will probably end up reading and maybe even posting questions (or answers or comments) into more than one of these various communities. The beauty of the system is that once you JOIN your first community, if you decide you want to join any additional community, your 'join-click' will recommend you choose to use your common profile and login-credentials, rather than go thru the long-winded form used to 'join' someone who doesn't already have an existing stackexchange membership [profile].

Another great feature is that, rather than it having single sub-categories into which you'll post your questions within a given community, they use (multiple) 'tags'. So, when anyone writes up their question, before they actually hit the 'post' button, they must associate one or more tags to their question. So, say in the gardening community, someone asks some question, and chooses the 2 tags 'watering' and 'fertilizer'.

Now someone else in that community reads your question and decides to post a 'comment' to they query, maybe just asking for clarification about the query, or just offering a sort-of-an-answer. Or, (bolder/more confidently) they decide to post a real ANSWER to the question. (Note...there can be more than one ANSWER to any given question.) And, answers can be voted-on, which is similar to Facebook's idea of 'likes'. People can 'voted' up or down on how good any given question and/or answer is.

Another very COOL feature is the ability to get an email-notification under various conditions. One condition is that you want to 'subscribe' (receive an email) for any activity on any one specific question that you see in the community. A similar feature a concept of you creating various 'filters' (that you give separate names to). So, when you click on some 'tag', you can they create yourself an email-notification filter, so that (e.g. once a day), you'll receive an email containing a summarized list of any new posting-activity on an/all questions that contain that specific tag.
So,if there is some tag that you truly care much MORE about than other tags, you can create a 'filter' for that tag, that will then notifiy you as I described. There's the 'meta' community, which discusses how to USE the features COMMON among the various community Q/A forums. Here's a query related to filters and subscriptions, that will give you insight into the various email-related concepts: META-info on filters, subscriptions, etc
So, for example, let's say our psychiatrist specializes in sleep disorders, so she could setup a filter so that all new posts in the next 24-hours that contain the 'SLEEP' tag, cause her to get an email containing the subjects of those new 'sleep'-related postings.


Was I some sort of 'hippy' back in my younger days???
Wow! I'd forgotten how long my hair was, back in the mid '80s. [ Tho, I do recall getting a 'perm' before going to Brazil, in an effort to resemble Gene Wilder. ]

Other related info
Chromecast device and how to tab-cast to it

I originally purchased Google's 'ChromeCast' (aka 'GoogleCast') HDMI-dongle, back in July/August 2013. It sells for about $30.00. Here's a short geeks-eye view of ChromeCast device and how you make your HD-tv a portal to the Internet (to allow you to watch Internet-based entertainment content) on your TV using their ChromeCast HDMI-dongle. And here are instructions to setup tab-casting for your ChromeCast dongle.

Here's my Chromecast (HDMI-dongle) usage notes:
Best first-learning exercise: Once setup on your wifi, then, with chromecast-booted and in-range:
Launch a YouTube video in the Chrome browser (and verify that there's NOW a cast-button near right-end of YouTube's viewer bar!
[ If that cast-button later ever fails to appear, first try stop/re-start of the Chrome browser (this fixed that exact issue for me)! ]

There are two choices for how to do 'initial chromecast dongle setup' (i.e. wifi-config, e. g after holding-down button until it factory-resets):
(Method #1) From a mobile-device (install and use "Google Home" app from Google's or Apple's store)
(Method #2) From a PC's chrome-browser(mine was v63.x on Win-10): Go to http://chromecast.com/setup
and choose that lower line of text saying: "...setup from this computer..."
That screen will spin-detect-and-find it, and then shows 'Chromecast[pin#nnnn]' when ready for the wifi-channel and password-entry step.
(This 2nd method dialog seems 'cleaner/clearer' to me, so I recommend it over using the 'Google Home' app. But, either one works for me.)




These days, it seems like 'Amazon Fire' is the preferred solution, to make a non-smart, HDMI-ported TV, into a 'smart' TV. ( Because it has a voice-interface) But, there is a 3-year-old Roku-unit on the non-smart bedroom TV, and it works just fine. There's some good 2017 device tradeoffs discussion here


In August 2015, I gifted my old Nexus-7 to a friend, and upgraded to Google's 9-inch model called Nexus-9. It IS very nice! It shipped with Android 'Lollipop' (v5.0.x), but I soon received an over-the-air upgrade to 'Marshmallow' (v6.0.x]. I've received another update to 'Nougat' (v7.1.x). My understanding is that Nexus units no longer get product-lifetime OS updates, but rather two years of OS-updates. Thus, after two years, i.e. after August 2017, I'll no longer get OS-major updates (but I will continue to get 'security' updates and Linux-kernel bug-fixes, etc).

Any of the tablets from Google's 'Nexus-family' re highly recommended. What differentiates these 'Nexus' devices, is that they are totally 'Google-branded', in that Android-updates, including new MAJOR-upgrades are not held back as dictated by some OTHER vendor and thus Google can and DOES continue to update Android to the highest version available, for the first two years . [ Hence, Nexus-family devices also known as 'developer-market' tablets/phones, since app-developers that are targeting the Android OS want/need availability to the latest and greatest features of Android, to test their code against. ]

My Linux-cheat-sheet (for Debian-family Linux distributions)


[If you get 'breakage' in final phase of Linux-upgrading, then at run-level-3, re-issue these 2 cmds:]
  apt-get update
  apt-get -f install
[This has always worked for me!!!]
  [ Oh, got nVidia or ATi graphics? If so, find/use the 'sgfxi' web-provided cmd-script to upgrade to your newest-available graphics driver. ]



(From a very literate British playwright...a Nobel Prize in Literature winner...)
(From a western cowboy...)

A COWBOY TOMBSTONE:

Here are the Five Rules for Men to Follow for a Happy Life that Russell J. Larsen had inscribed on his headstone in Logan, Utah. He died not knowing that he would win the "Coolest Headstone" contest.


FIVE RULES FOR MEN TO FOLLOW FOR A HAPPY LIFE:
1. It's important to have a woman who helps at home, cooks from time to time, cleans up, and has a job.
2. It's important to have a woman who can make you laugh.
3. It's important to have a woman who you can trust, and doesn't lie to you.
4. It's important to have a woman who is good in bed, and likes to be with you.
5. It's very, very important that these four women do not know each other or you could end up dead like me.
Contact info
You can email this 'Webster' here.